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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 616 (some duplicates have been removed)
aspects. >> what better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ >> hello, my name is jamie harper. in this episode, we are featuring the park locations in your very own backyard. this is your chance to find your heart in san francisco with someone special. golden gate park's largest body of water is this lake, a popular spot for
, if you follow the metaphor that bullying is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to mak
a lot of work on measuring levels of chemicals in people and environments, so one study she did was with also in richmond california to looking at the different levels of chemicals, diesel exhaust in richmond which you would expect to be very different, and she's going to help us see if we can build a study, so this was a great thing that you brought to our attention. >> i start to think about it over the years but especially working in an airport and now in an actively working diesel pump station. >> and it's not something you have any control over, and that's the same kind of fragmentation we're seeing at all levels, it's hard to make changes when jurisdictions move. >> but if i could get her contact information or something after the presentation, that would be great. >> okay, cool. >> i had two questions, one is you were just saying to use glass when you're cooking or microwave, what about -- i was told before that you could use plastic for the refrigerator or storage, are you saying avoid plastics all together for food storage, and then the second question is water bottles
've been a fish or a bird or a game species of some kind or a forest. when we think about the environment and our place and i come the species of concern became us. what we do to the environment and what we do to ourselves in the process. so i think when i looked back five decades in the rearview mirror, we can actually see the beginnings of this change in the way we think about the national world. michael rachel carson fault line come a tipping point between these two things. she had a strong presence in conservation movement, which i'll talk about in a moment and was really an affect the founder of the modern environmental movement. i think it's possible to actually point to a specific moment in time when that happened, when we began to think differently about the environment and our relation to it. it came in the late summer of 1962 about a month before rachel "silent spring" is an unpublished. in june of 1962 come at the yorker published three long excerpts. through the course of the summary huge controversy flared up around the book and people began to take sides on it and people beg
that are responding in a military environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part
stable. and we went straight to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the
environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis this country has faced since the depression. and we believe if somebody can show that they
past that meander up and down the park under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prep
leave them in a cold environment, you don't know where they've come from or they've been in ship holds which is really hot, just as a number one rule, if you smell something plastic don't drink out of it. >> that's good advice. >> i have two questions, they're a little bit unrelated but the first one goes on the scheme of plastic, so plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around that and then use the
environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to carry into this.
environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and they have all been burned there. the record is very c
, paying his visit to capitol hill. why do we not see that any more? is it two sides or environment is so hardened? >> i think so. i also think that personality of these two men would not be best described as anti-social they to. but we're seeing this weird culture of bipartisan, you know we were supposed to put it away after the elect, and think about what is best of the country. i think they are staaing separate, they should be eating at the same table now. neil: they are not doing that. there is so much you could dodo with a serogate, and say surprise it seems to me, dr., doctor when ronald reagan heard things come up out of capitol hill, or tip o'neill he brought him over to the white house, said how can we compromise on this his famous line, i would rather get 80% of a loaf or no loaf at all, we don't see it, it is either my way or the highway, and i blame motorcycl both side. >> i do too, you said the word, compromise that is what works in great marriaging and even politics. meet in the middle. neil: why not have it at the white house? i think that white house, if you do something i
of an advantage because the environment to change quickly. it took thousands of years for the environment to change. just enough process of changing behavior over thousands of generations was good enough for species until the cretaceous extinction of this cataclysmic event 65 million years ago we see geological evidence of it everywhere in the world. something dramatic happened and changed the environment suddenly 65 million years ago. we do not environment change suddenly. surpass inside the species who could not adapt very quickly died out. that's actually when the mammals came to prominence in the ecological lives. so they anthropomorphize biological evolution. so it started growing as mammals evolved. by the time you get to primates, it is no longer just a plain. it now has all these convolutions, basically to extend its surface area. so in any primates it has all these issues. you can still stretch it out and make a cheese about the size of a large table napkin, still thin and still be a delay of that now comprises 80% of the brain. it's basically where we do our hierarchical thinkin
are not in a position to do things that we otherwise would be in a position to in terms of shaping the environment to prevent war. so in my view, americas 60 veto fiscal picture increases the risk of conflict around the globe media not always involving the u.s., though certainly the risk of increasing globally. based on our fiscal picture. the point that i would want to make is the budget deal requires us to deal with a full deck of cards and those people who keep wanting to take things off the table. when i say a full deck of cards, that includes defense participating in deficit reduction. this cannot be in the case of defense a sledgehammer approach. it's going to take a long line of dealing with these issues overtime to give the defense department time and they can make in my view very significant changes in the budget, but doing it in a way that does not damage our security. doing it abruptly as the fiscal cliff does or in a very compressed time frame is not only inefficient and dangerous to security in our s. my final point is that they are missing an element in this town is primarily politic
is that the qualitiv of our environment here in the bay area is key, is a very key factor to maintaining our economic health and vitality. we need strong economic -- sorry, environmental protections and regulations. we have come to the conclusion that c-e-q-a provides none of that. c-e-q-a is a law that is for all intents and purposes obsolete. some of the people who spoke before me mentioned that many, many federal and state statutes that have been passed since c-e-q-a was written into law in 1970, that duplicate what c-e-q-a does. all of c-e-q-a currently does is absent those additional protections is put in place a very lengthy process for review and a very low threshold for litigation. that low threshold for litigation invites bad players into the process. if you look at who sues projects and who tries to stop projects, three main constituencies, the environmental community is not one of them. the labor community sues projects for project labor agreements, to try and leverage those agreements from project sponsors. not so long ago i was downstairs at the hearing for the cathedral hill hospital wh
attack on the environment. under the current ordinances, the [speaker not understood] must decide whether the project may have a significant effect on the environment based on a fair argument standard. [speaker not understood] code 31.1. the proposed amendment eliminates all references to the fair argument standard and adopts a new substantial evidence legal standard for the city's c-e-q-a purposes. the fair argument standard is another standard than substantial evident. under california statute, the city must create an e-i-r when a project may have a significant effect upon the environment. the legal standard in question is an interpretation of may. accordingly, it is likely more projects would require an e-i-r under the fair standard -- fair argument standard and pier project would require an e-i-r under the substantial evidence standard. more over, california case law has consistently adopted the fair argument standard when interpreting whether the project may have a significant effect on the environment. thus it is unclear whether the city of san francisco has the authority to change
't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spanish i can tell you a whole bunch of terms that people use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and in san francisco we are proud
down the exterior of the building. so imaging that this will be a very calm environment when it comes to controlling wind. and it also allows us to address the whole issue of how to avoid birds flying into the structure. that extra depth and and keeping the birds from hitting the building. if you look across first street you see one of the key retail lobbies of the center at the street level. and you see the entrance to parking and you see the relationship between the north edge of the transit center and the south edge of the tower. now, you are standing across mission street. at the corner of mission and freemont. once again you see the heavier metallic work at the base of the tower and you see the grove of redwoods and the sculpture at the corner and you see how lively and prominent that is going to be and i think that it is welcoming public presence in the streets of san francisco. and you are now looking directly across mission street, the tower is on your right and the grove of redwoods are inviting you to enter the center and immediately on access in front of you are the two mai
and reminding me "you don't cut the trees down. we have to take care of our environment. we need a rich canopy of trees in the city" and this what is means to so many people, and he was one of strong voice bs our environment. he has been known for that and in the years of 2000 he took up the college trustee on the board. many of you know in the past years he was passionate about his work at city college. he knew, and again we had the opportunity to share what we got out of college and what so many generations of youth would want and desire in our city college. he was leading the effort in my opinion to restore and to elevate the level of integrity and transparency at our city college. he demanded that of the other trustees as well as the administration . he went through some hard times as a trustee and shared with members here of the difficult years when things weren't as transparent as they should have been and integrity wasn't at the top of someone's mindful priorities but this is something he stood for. this is something him and his family stood for. as i know carolyn and her work on t
an environment where tech companies can thrive but with with the thing that they would give back and i want to commend them for setting the standards that are moving in and we have several agreements that are about to be signed before the end the year. it is clear they have impact on the surrounding neighborhood and working closely with the residents and the community. this is extremely important so i know that the zen dust soon to be ceo and his partners couldn't be here today but tiffany is here on behalf of zen dusk. by the way she is on maternity leave and still came in to get the award and i want to bring up a couple more people to speak about the impact they have had with them but tiffany i wanted to give you an opportunity to speak first. >>i wanted to thank you for recognizing us. and the agreement we executed and we filed a second one and a pleasure to execute. we felt it helped integrate us into the community and everyday we are braced more and more and understanding the tenderloin and the tenderloin is establishing us and couldn't have done it without the community benefits a
and education about our waterfront, about the environment, about the balance of nature, and in the urban setting and of course it not have happened on the theme i will talk about the rest of my administration which is the team work that has to happen. we have rec and part that administers the bond. we have the port with its staff and byron and susan reynolds and working with public works to open up this area with the private sector whether it's ledge or the park advocates or the green space or the blue green advocates and this is all connected when i was taught during my dpb days and we had people walk along the water way and experience the wonderful, wonderful initial resources that we had, so all of these investments. >> >> will bring a lot of great use of open space to this area and not to forget we have a little off lease dog run that is also added in here for our dog lovers which there are countless many in the city and having an area where the dogs can play with their guardians and having a natural place for this to happen. you see all of the elements happening here and i want to thank
environments. then you are able to deliver a new, interesting experience. you have the information that we all love, but also married that with the pipe. i hopefully -- i hope that you can create new experiences. >> from time warner, they predicted that all channels will be like hbo. subscription-based. >> people say that. >> he did not say all cards -- ala carte. >> i didn't think that he would. what that means is that people will have an anywhere anytime approach to the television device. my show is on at 7:30. i am angry with my mother because we are out shopping and if we do not get back in the next 20 minutes, i am going to mess it -- i'm going to miss it. and i am not going to have any ability to catch up to it or see it again. no child today has that experience, first of all, already. but the new dimension that is going to come into that is the devices. the ability to get to all of these other things. which is what you see people talking about software and i.t. meaning if i can speak the language of all these devices, then i can put this into all computing devices. and then you have the
environment and lastly we looked how can we encourage private sector investment and new and the city can't do this on its own. we need to work with the private sector and leverage this and that could be look at programs to reduce the cost of and expand clean energy financing and with pace and other mechanisms, pursuing third party ownerships and partnerships to develop more renewable energy. levering caa and and to the fee and tariff and having this set of customers under cca and guaranteed off takers the renewable power for years to come you can assure to the developers there is the market to sell into and thereby help them to get financing and get projects on the ground and supporting clean investments. for example by working with the pension and retirement funds to use some portion of the portfolios to go towards these programs and demonstrations on public property and that's been started already on clean power sf. we have almost 40 members in total and it's a fantastic group and we're lucky to have knowledgeable folks and universities in the area and active community members so a very
a canopy of 0, redwood, pine, and eucalyptus. chill out and this environment and you might see butterflies and dandelions. blue jays fly between the eucalyptus. it is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. six, 24, or 71 bus. we have conquered the steps, we walked the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view the park has to offer. this is the place to take someone special and enjoyed a beautiful look out. " come to corona heights, located in the heart of this district. it offers a spectacular view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. the park is one of the best kept secrets. unlike twin peaks, it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. hop on a 37 bus to get there with that any parking worries. locals can bring their dogs to run with other dogs. there is also grass for small dogs. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place for the city to provide these kind of parks. the dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice the wildflowers on the grassland. and keep your head on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. take
a pollution, dangerous to the environment in co2 is of course that these plans. they attempt to surprise or two epitomize the anti-nature, enterprise spirit of this administration. the reason we need another supply-side revival of the same kind we had under ronald reagan. >> would you change anything you wrote in the original "wealth and poverty"? >> i would've changed quite a lot. there's all kinds of details that a changed. but i found that to try to change one thing would be to change everything. so you know, you get into the morass of editorial work. so instead of changing an essentially retained the old look and added 40,000 new words at the beginning and kind and revision of my monetary policy in the middle. it's a new book, but it contains the old book veered >> pennysaver bishop monetary policy, what do you mean by that? >> i failed to make clear in the original version of "wealth and poverty" that i believe can stable currencies. i don't believe including current these. i agree with steve forbes that flow currencies, which is the standard value by which every entrepreneur has to
the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedicate this to my father. my mom flew in tonight. my brother, who works for bart. [applause] i have my nephew
health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building
. the most extreme environments. it's not the best place to look for life. in fact, there is water. in fact, the water is located in deep craters, near the north pole. mercury kind of orbits with very little tilt. near the north pole with the deep craters, it never gets subject. that's why it's so cold. but much of the water is covered by a thin layer of organic material. >> all right. i think we're having a little trouble hearing lawrence there. we'll try and get him back because it is a really interesting discussion. we'll work on that. >>> his resume includes two academy awards, five golden globes, and an emmy. now dustin hoffman will be able to add a new honor to that impressive list. we'll tell you what it is. >>> first, if you're looking for a getaway, think springtime in paris. that's where we find our this week's travel insider. >> reporter: i lived in paris during college, so going back always brings back memories. one of my favorite things to do, then and now, sit outside and sip espresso or a glass of wine at a cafe. the french invented the concept. cafe de flore is my pick. if y
the cats that are in this pretty complex environment and trying to get them moving in a common direction. >> general baldwin? >> first, i'm very, very encouraged at the direction the department of defense has taken in changing the way that we do support the civil authorities. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no visibility on what forces are available at camp pen
to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have poverty, a quarter of our children have no health care. what was a million students a year and a half ago is now a million and a half. when you have good nutrition and good health, you will learn better. it goes hand in hand with good mental health and a good school environment. the research points out, we want our k
environment. we may find ourselves in a different in varmint in which they will have less choice. the actuarial estimates are that the fha books of business will more than pay for themselves. what we're looking for them to do is pay for the losses we incurred when we were playing a counter-cyclical role. the phrase i always use, it is inherent to an insurance model. fha does it for a public purpose. there is a point at which -- i have had plenty of economists argue that it is not rational for us to charge today's home buyers more than it costs us to pay for the losses of the past. we had a large, traumatic, national emergency. think of it as the hurricane sandy or hurricane katrina of the housing market. maybe the public sector ought to say -- the economists say we should write the check for the treasury and we should go back to starting the future homebuyers at a price that is rational. the financing mechanism and the like. i think we should do that, with there are limits to how far you can do that. there are limits to what you can do with the pricing. when the private market co
on the overall security environment on the peninsula as well as in asia. >> did you follow up anything new? we been hearing rumblings for a time. anything new you can provide in terms of insight into lunches are things like that? >> i think you're tracking it pretty well for the media today there are indications of what they will call a satellite launch. we believe it is still the u.n. security resolutions because of the missile they'll be fired and the implications it has for ballistic missiles activity somewhere down the road and the destabilizing impact it will have on the security environment throughout the region, not just dependent. >> can you follow up on some of that? what is your assessment? they say they saw birth of her problems at their failed launch. what is your assessment? how could they have felt the problems? juicier ran possibly helping them? and do you think he's doing this in response to hard-liners in his own government? why would he be doing this? >> well, the professed reason is to probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary on the 17th, which is widely reported i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 616 (some duplicates have been removed)